Son of Perdition

Who is the son of perdition?

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JOHN 17 BIBLE STUDY

John 17:12-19 Son of Perdition

JOHN 17:12  12 While I was with them in the world, I kept them in Your name. Those whom You gave Me I have kept; and none of them is lost except the son of perdition, that the Scripture might be fulfilled.

What is meant by, "the son of perdition”?
Apoleias, the Greek word translated, "perdition," means, "destruction" or "ruin".

Who is the “lost... son of perdition”?
Judas Iscariot, who, after betraying Jesus, committed suicide instead of repenting, and went to hell for eternal destruction.

By saying, "Those whom You gave Me, I have kept; and none of them is lost except the son of perdition," is Jesus saying that He lost someone that He was expected to keep or should have kept?
No, "gave" does not connote the need to 'keep'. When chosen as one of the twelve disciples of Jesus, Judas may or may not have known that he would betray Jesus three years later. Satan may have thought that he had managed to infiltrate Jesus' inner circle with a thief whose love of money could be used later to betray. But God the Father and Jesus knew perfectly well that Judas would betray and that his betrayal would lead to Jesus' arrest and crucifixion, and had included him among the twelve disciples for that purpose. Throughout the Bible, God used both heaven-bound and hell-bound people to direct history. Those who associate being used by God with salvation while continuing to live in sin do so at their peril: "Many will say to Me in that day, ‘Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name?’ And then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from Me, ye who practice lawlessness!’" (Matthew 7:22-23)

JOHN 17:13-16  13 But now I come to You, and these things I speak in the world, that they may have My joy fulfilled in themselves. 14 I have given them Your word; and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. 15 I do not pray that You should take them out of the world, but that You should keep them from the evil one. 16 They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world.

Does Jesus want Christians to isolate themselves from the non-Christian world?
No: "I do not pray that You should take them out of the world" (John 17:15). He wants Christians to remain in the world to spread His truth and love, and to engage in the spiritual fight against the "evil one" (John 17:15), from whom the Father will provide His protection. What He wants is not for Christians to be taken out of the world, but for the worldliness to be taken out Christians.

What is the world's expected reaction to Christians?
Hatred: "the world has hated them because they are not of the world." (John 17:14)

Does the non-Christian world respect you or love you as one of its own?
 

JOHN 17:17-19  17 Sanctify them by Your truth. Your word is truth. 18 As You sent Me into the world, I also have sent them into the world. 19 And for their sakes I sanctify Myself, that they also may be sanctified by the truth.

Why does Jesus say that He sanctifies Himself in John 17:19?
Hagiazo, the Greek word translated, “sanctify,” usually means "to make holy," but it also means, "to set apart to the service of and to loyalty to deity.” By praying, "And for their sakes I sanctify Myself" (John 17:19), Jesus wasn't saying that He, who is already sinless and holy, needs to be made holy, but that He sets Himself apart for service to the Father - i.e., death on the cross.

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